The doubled consonant (shadda)

     
                     

  Watch summary video
(2.26 min)

Writing Two Letters as One.

 

  What are Shaddas?

        An Arabic word frequently has two similar consonants in a row with a syllabic break between them.

Don't ask why.

Understanding the double consonant pattern makes reading a lot easier.

Shaddas are only placed above consonants. Shaddas require for the consonant to be pronounced twice.

        Instead of writing the consonant twice we place a shadda above one copy of the consonant.

Sum-up:

         1- The first consonant can never carry a short vowel but instead an implied sequoun (no vowel).

View the sequoun as a stop sign -- so you can start a new syllable.

         2- The second consonant must carry a damma, fatha, or kasra.

        

 

        Beware: The tricky part about the shadda is saying the consonant twice without fumbling the word. How not to fumble?

A- There is a syllabic break between the two consonants.
B- The second consonant carries a short vowel (fatha, kasra, or dumma).

Arabic learners see shaddas and freak out. No need. Deal with shaddas gracefully.


        

 

 Example



عَرَبِيَّةْ
1
çarabiy-ya

 car
 

Because يَّ carries a shadda ّ the letter is doubled:
يْ The first yih always carries an implied sequoun.
يَ The second yih carries one of the three short vowels. In our case, here, the yih is carrying a fatha.

        

       

 

 


Listen then say out loud  

          Listen then say out loud the below doubled consonants.

Examples



عَرَبِيَّةْ
1
çarabiy-ya  

car



هُوَّ
2
how-wa   

he



هُمَّ
3
hom-ma  

they


🔴 See more examples 😊 😊


 

Keep going! You're almost there.

 
   

  So now you know that doubled consonants                          
usually have a syllabic break in the middle. 
                                     

 
   

  
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